Discussion:
Apple IIe Keyboard Switches
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Tom Frikker
2014-02-02 00:54:41 UTC
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Hello everyone,
Does anyone know where I can buy some key switches for the Apple IIe? I have the original IIe with the dark gray keys, and the key switches have a white cap on the end, if that clears things up at all.
-Tom
Jay Graham
2014-02-02 03:00:15 UTC
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Post by Tom Frikker
Hello everyone,
Does anyone know where I can buy some key switches for the Apple IIe? I
have the original IIe with the dark gray keys, and the key switches have a
white cap on the end, if that clears things up at all.
-Tom
Tom,

I have tons of Apple IIe keyswitches from the various generations. If you
send me a picture of it, I'll see what I can go.

***@zoominternet.net

Thanks,
Jay
groink_hi
2017-07-04 05:48:08 UTC
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Post by Tom Frikker
Hello everyone,
Does anyone know where I can buy some key switches for the Apple IIe? I have the original IIe with the dark gray keys, and the key switches have a white cap on the end, if that clears things up at all.
-Tom
I have the same white key switches, but it is on a rev. D Apple II plus. Are there any sources for the spring that sits under the RESET key cap? I'm also looking for the POWER light cover, as the cover I have has the letters wiped off. Or, is there someone who could laser print the letters onto my blank?
Michael J. Mahon
2017-07-04 16:29:10 UTC
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Post by groink_hi
Post by Tom Frikker
Hello everyone,
Does anyone know where I can buy some key switches for the Apple IIe? I
have the original IIe with the dark gray keys, and the key switches have
a white cap on the end, if that clears things up at all.
-Tom
I have the same white key switches, but it is on a rev. D Apple II plus.
Are there any sources for the spring that sits under the RESET key cap?
I'm also looking for the POWER light cover, as the cover I have has the
letters wiped off. Or, is there someone who could laser print the letters onto my blank?
Any spring supplier should have springs that will work under the Reset key.
This spring was often replaced with an even stronger spring to prevent
unintended resets.

The legend on the power light cover can be replaced with transfer letters
and then lacquered to "fix" them.
--
-michael - NadaNet 3.1 and AppleCrate II: http://michaeljmahon.com
groink_hi
2017-07-04 22:55:25 UTC
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I didn't realize springs is a complete science. LOL!!!!

Anyway, the original spring that comes with the keyboard is 1.0mm thick, 10mm diameter, and 20mm long. This would be 1*10*20 in spring lingo. The tension of the spring appears to be somewhat weak, as it has around two to two 1/2 windings. The more windings, the more tension therefore the harder it is to push the RESET button down.

The stem on the switch is also in play. The length from the base of the switch to where the key cap sits is 10mm. So, this 20mm spring is compressed in half while it sits there. Then, when you press the key cap, the stem shrink down to 7mm. That means the spring only pushes down 3mm.

So, while Googling around, I can't find the exact spring. But, I've found springs that come pretty close. One spring is 1*10*20, but it has four windings - double that of the original spring. There's also a 1*10*15, which is shorter but it has three windings.

I'm wondering if getting the 1*10*15 is the better one? Although it has slightly more windings than the original spring, being 5mm shorter, along with the existing stem and key cap, it may come close to the tension of the original spring.

Any thoughts????
groink_hi
2017-07-04 23:31:49 UTC
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I didn't realize springs is a complete science. LOL!!!!

Anyway, the original spring that comes with the keyboard is 1.0mm thick, 10mm diameter, and 20mm long. This would be 1*10*20 in spring lingo. The tension of the spring appears to be somewhat weak, as it has around two to two 1/2 windings. The more windings, the more tension therefore the harder it is to push the RESET button down.

The stem on the switch is also in play. The length from the base of the switch to where the key cap sits is 13mm. So, this 20mm spring is compressed almost in half while it sits there. Then, when you press the key cap, the stem shrink down to 7mm. That means the spring pushes down 6mm.

So, while Googling around, I can't find the exact spring. But, I've found springs that come pretty close. One spring is 1*10*20, but it has four windings - double that of the original spring. There's also a 1*10*15, which is shorter but it has three windings.

I'm wondering if getting the 1*10*15 is the better one? Although it has slightly more windings than the original spring, being 5mm shorter, along with the existing stem and key cap, it may come close to the tension of the original spring.

Any thoughts????
Michael J. Mahon
2017-07-05 07:20:37 UTC
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Post by groink_hi
I didn't realize springs is a complete science. LOL!!!!
Anyway, the original spring that comes with the keyboard is 1.0mm thick,
10mm diameter, and 20mm long. This would be 1*10*20 in spring lingo. The
tension of the spring appears to be somewhat weak, as it has around two
to two 1/2 windings. The more windings, the more tension therefore the
harder it is to push the RESET button down.
The stem on the switch is also in play. The length from the base of the
switch to where the key cap sits is 13mm. So, this 20mm spring is
compressed almost in half while it sits there. Then, when you press the
key cap, the stem shrink down to 7mm. That means the spring pushes down 6mm.
So, while Googling around, I can't find the exact spring. But, I've found
springs that come pretty close. One spring is 1*10*20, but it has four
windings - double that of the original spring. There's also a 1*10*15,
which is shorter but it has three windings.
I'm wondering if getting the 1*10*15 is the better one? Although it has
slightly more windings than the original spring, being 5mm shorter, along
with the existing stem and key cap, it may come close to the tension of
the original spring.
Any thoughts????
Nothing about the spring is critical--it just needs to fit and produce the
desired resistance.

In the day, some users put an O-ring under the Reset key, so it really
needed to be pressed!

Shame you don't have a bunch of springs to try--a well-stocked scrapbox is
a wonderful thing. ;-)
--
-michael - NadaNet 3.1 and AppleCrate II: http://michaeljmahon.com
groink_hi
2017-07-05 08:33:19 UTC
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Thinking about it, I really don't need a spring. I'm keeping the CTRL-RESET option enabled on the encoder board.
D Finnigan
2017-07-05 15:24:12 UTC
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Post by groink_hi
Thinking about it, I really don't need a spring. I'm keeping the
CTRL-RESET
option enabled on the encoder board.
Man, that's just a matter of personal preference. But me, I wouldn't trade
single-finger reset on the integer II and the II Plus for anything! Just way
too convenient. :-0
--
]DF$
Apple II 40th Anniversary User's Guide:
http://macgui.com/newa2guide/
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